A few examples of my work include award-winning features and Page-1 breaking news stories, as well as in-depth interviews and long-form magazine stories: 

Don't wait, pie lovers say, you can taste it hot from the oven

By Dan Mayfield 

Journal Staff Writer

    There's something about pie. Pie brings families together. Pie makes people fall in love. Pie can bring world peace! Maybe if George Bush gave Kim Jong-Il some of Laura's homemade pumpkin pie, he'd forget about all this nuclear bomb stuff.
    Mamie Eisenhower's pumpkin pie recipe is one of the great American treasures. First lady Abigail Van Buren made a great pecan pie, and greats like Bob Hope (lemon) and Ann Landers (pecan) made pie. Even Jimmy Carter makes a (what else?) peanut butter pie.
    Don McLean and Kenny Chesney have sung about it.
    Why? Because they know it's the great equalizer. Everybody can get a big slice, and with coffee or hot cocoa, it makes for a great conversation starter, meal ender, afternoon or midnight snack. It also makes a great gift. Who doesn't like to get a pie?
    It's unpretentious and is at home on bone china at a state dinner as it is on a paper plate at a cookout.
    And there is something about pie, something about a mouthful of fresh fruit, putting a fork through that perfect flaky crust, or mashing your tongue against a fluffy meringue.
    Mamie Eisenhower's pumpkin pie recipe is one of the great American treasures. First lady Abigail Van Buren made a great pecan pie, and greats like Bob Hope (lemon) and Ann Landers (pecan) made pie. Even Jimmy Carter makes a (what else?) peanut butter pie.
    Don McLean and Kenny Chesney have sung about it.
    Why? Because they know it's the great equalizer. Everybody can get a big slice, and with coffee or hot cocoa, it makes for a great conversation starter, meal ender, afternoon or midnight snack. It also makes a great gift. Who doesn't like to get a pie?
    It's unpretentious and is at home on bone china at a state dinner as it is on a paper plate at a cookout.
    And there is something about pie, something about a mouthful of fresh fruit, putting a fork through that perfect flaky crust, or mashing your tongue against a fluffy meringue.

Follow this LINK for the story as it appeared in the Albuquerque Journal (also recipes!)


Critics Pounce On
Lack of Board Diversity

The board of directors of the University of New Mexico's Innovate ABQ center can certainly claim decades of experience in banking, politics and administration.

But it can't claim diversity, critics say.

Innovate ABQ is designed to be a live-work-play center on seven acres Downtown that caters to the city's new startup and research culture. But, say critics, the board of directors appointed on Oct. 29 doesn't reflect that.

"I think the Innovate ABQ board really needs to reflect their mission, and if you look at their faces, it doesn't," said Beverlee McClure, head of the Association of Commerce and Industry and a former cabinet secretary for higher education.

"We've had a stated commitment to millennials. It's almost seems that we've gone the wrong direction. I was really stunned about the lack of diversity on the board," she said.

The new board members include many well-known names in the city's business community: Sherman McCorkle, a former banker and head of Technology Ventures Corp. for 21 years; Albuquerque Mayor Richard BerryTerry Laudick, president and CEO of New Mexico Educators Federal Credit Union; Charles Wellborn, the retired former president of STC.UNM; and two UNM administrators, Richard Larson and David Harris.

In announcing the board, UNM President Bob Frank said, "We envision a high-energy district where people live in closer proximity. We want it to be more pedestrian-friendly and offer a place for students and entrepreneurs to work and live."

But there are no students or entrepreneurs on the board.

"No minorities, no women, no entrepreneurs, no millennials, all the things we say were trying to encourage downtown," McClure said.

Read the rest HERE

After the flood, sun shines on Emcore again

Dr. Hong Hou knew he needed to do something. Hou is the CEO of Emcore Corp., the state’s second-largest publicly traded company. It’s been losing money for several years, although its high-tech photovoltaic panels and fiber optics are in high demand.
The company reported a profit for the first time in many years, posting net income of $2.8 million for the quarter ended Dec. 31, compared to a $14.2 million loss for the same quarter last year. Now, Hou said, the company, which has 1,000 employees in Albuquerque and Alhambra, Calif. and a market capitalization of about $173 million, is turning a corner and focusing on a strategy of commanding a premium price for a high-performance product.
“The last couple of years, I’ve spent most of my time on transactions, divestitures, the business restructuring to get the company on solid ground strategically,” Hou said in an exclusive interview with Albuquerque Business First. “The strategy is starting to pan out. The difference now, compared to the past, is that I wouldn’t say in the past we had the right strategy. We took a lot of risk.”

After two restructurings, one divestiture and a partnership with a Chinese firm, Emcore’s last earnings report was a breath of fresh air. 

Read the rest of the story HERE

My work goes beyond writing. I've worked in radio and TV for several years. I also do the occasional voice-over project, such as this for the New Mexico State Bar. 

Click on the Watch The Video link below the gavel at THIS LINK.

 

The White Belt Has Itself Wrapped Around Our Hip 

By Dan Mayfield
Journal Staff Writer
    Why aren't hipsters good at karate? They can't get past the White Belt. The White Belt has become the ultimate hipster accessory. What complements old-school Pumas, chunky plastic glasses, a Vespa and a pack of Parliaments better?
    "It's almost like the fashion industry is telling us ugly is the new pretty," says Heather Cronin— who won't admit to being a hipster, but who works at Sparky's Trading Co., which sells all the requisite hipster accessories, like vintage belt buckles, Paul Frank bicycles and cabby hats.
    "Everybody has one," she says.
    A White Belt, that is.
    No other accessory identifies a hipster like the White Belt. Not the '70s ski vest, not the ironic mustache, not the star tattoo.
    (But now that the Albuquerque Journal has discovered the belt, will all the hipsters stuff them away in their closets with their 1992 flannel shirts, purses with skulls on them and ska records?)
    "There is all that mod '60s resurgence of that look, the White Belt," said Das Anastasiou, owner of Sparky's.


Follow this LINK to see  the story as it appeared in the Albuquerque Journal.